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FreakZ Open Source Zigbee Stack | Print |
Written by Akiba   
Tuesday, 18 November 2008

Background:

Zigbee is a low-power, low-cost, wireless sensor networking protocol defined by the Zigbee Alliance. The protocol was designed for low data rate wireless networks to facilitate automation and monitoring for applications such as home/building/HVAC automation, industrial control, farming, patient monitoring, and many other applications that could take advantage of low cost wireless communication and don't have a high data rate requirement.

Motivation:

One of the problems with the current state of Zigbee is that the software is either provided by semiconductor suppliers and bound to their hardware, or is proprietary and requires heavy licensing fees. This causes some major issues that I have a problem with:

1) It's very difficult for individual electronics enthusiasts to create their own Zigbee designs since they usually cannot afford the licensing fees or the costs of the proprietary tools (compilers, debuggers, etc) associated with developing a Zigbee application. In many cases, some of the most innovative creations come from individual enthusiasts or people with specific domain knowledge that might not be addressed by software or semiconductor vendors. I'm hoping that having a free stack with full source code access will allow people the freedom to create interesting things and hopefully create projects that can improve other people's lives.

2) It's almost impossible to mix and match hardware to optimize an application. Some designs are limited to using an ARM microcontroller since it may be part of an SOC that's needed for a specific application, ie: MP3 or video decoding. However the application would benefit from the addition of wireless communications. There currently isn't an easy way to take an MCU such as an ARM based one and mix it with an 802.15.4 radio from a different vendor to make a Zigbee application. This is because the Zigbee software given away by semiconductor vendors is either in binary form or contains a license clause which only permits the use of the software with their hardware. Software companies selling proprietary stacks usually charge stack licensing fees that can go upwards of $50k and also require fees for driver modification for specific MCUs. One of the goals of this project is to provide a free Zigbee stack which will give designer's flexibility in choosing their components with no proprietary lock-in.

Download:

The FreakZ Zigbee stack is an open source stack that is currently under development. The latest source code can be downloaded at SourceForge at the following address:

http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/freakz

The source can also be downloaded from the SourceForge Subversion repository here:

https://freakz.svn.sourceforge.net/svnroot/freakz

You can browse the documentation in html format from the following link:

http://www.freaklabs.org/freakz/v0_75/html/index.html

You can download the FreakZ Simulator and USB Hardware Command Line Interface here:

http://www.freaklabs.org/freakz/v0_75/FreakZ Simulator Interface.pdf

 

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amazing!
written by arnold cahn, April 12, 2009
hello, i'd like to thank you for the amazing job you are doing. I hope to be able to test your zigbee stack soon.
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written by Akiba, April 12, 2009
Thanks! It's taking a lot longer than I expected because of the documentation, testing, and bug fixes. But it's also much more interesting than I expected it to be.
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written by Geoff, April 26, 2009
hey what development tools are you using Akiba? Visual studio? or something else?
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written by Akiba, April 26, 2009
Ha ha ha...wouldn't touch Visual Studio for embedded development, although it's a great IDE for Windows Application dev. I mostly use Slickedit which is a text editor with a lot of extra features and can integrate GCC into its build function. It's a commercial text editor though, and I think that Eclipse is probably just as good or better. I just haven't had the time to play with it too much.
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Great Job
written by DivineBlade, May 26, 2009
Hi Akiba....great job with the open source zigbee stack......I have a question though......Is the FreakZ stack Zigbee certified??....
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written by Akiba, May 26, 2009
The stack is not yet certified. I'm hoping to get it certified this year.
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written by Eugene Izmailov, July 10, 2009
You started a Great project. But I have a question. Does it possible to use your stack in projects based on Keil uVision IDE for X51 or ARM MCUs with using RTOS like RTX51 ? Thanks.
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written by Akiba, July 10, 2009
It would take a lot of porting to get it running inside RTX51. The FreakZ stack currently uses Contiki for its OS services.
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it's really a amazing job~
written by liu, August 04, 2009

Does it possible to port your stack to CC2430?

I have some CC2430EM module and I want to use the stack with them

smilies/smiley.gif
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written by Akiba, August 05, 2009
It currently doesn't support the CC2430. I would need to port it to either IAR or Keil which I don't really have access to at the moment. I'm planning on initially porting the stack to MCU architectures that are supported by GCC.
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Why did you choose to go full-time at this endeavor?
written by Michael Stoops, August 06, 2009
Akiba,

Why did you choose to take this on full-time? Is it because you believe so passionately in the cause? You think it's your golden opportunity to make a name for yourself? Just curious.
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written by Akiba, August 06, 2009
It's because I wanted an opportunity to use up all my savings and this kind of came along.
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Greate Job!
written by Edward, August 10, 2009
Greate job, Akiba. Is the stack free for both personal and comercial usage? What license is it released upon?
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written by Akiba, August 10, 2009
It's licensed under BSD with the additional requirement that it's subject to the IP restrictions in the Zigbee specification. That last part was added because Zigbee has a membership requirement clause in the spec if you want to use the protocol.
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Membership Requirement?
written by Anon, October 14, 2009
As to your last point re: membership requirement, does this mean that by using your stack, the user is still required to be a Zigbee Alliance member (adopter?).
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written by Akiba, October 14, 2009
No. Using the stack does not require membership. However the Zigbee spec states that sale of any products using Zigbee IP requires membership in the Zigbee Alliance. This condition was what caused controversy on the stack's eligibility to use the GPL. Since I was already considering using Modified BSD, I decided to switch the license to avoid any problems in the future. I added the additional condition that the stack was based on the Zigbee spec and subject to the conditions outlined in it because I wanted people to be aware that there were conditions attached to basing a product on the Zigbee specification. I don't care for promoting Zigbee membership.
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Wonderful!
written by dyan, October 20, 2009
Awesome effort Akiba, I am working on Zigbee, and infact, i attempted to design a sniffer as well using the stack from one of the vendors, but very strangely, i keep missing messages, atleast 10% of over the air traffic...and its random...i can never predict which msg i miss..
have you designed a sniffer as well?
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Help me understand.
written by MD, April 03, 2010
Even though I am not an electronics or programming person by trade, I consider myself an advanced user. I have written a lot of code for my core business and am at ease with various programming concepts. When I decided to investigage embedded controllers for fun, I was delighted to find the Arduino environment. It seemed ready-made for my skill set and provided a comfortable, quick-start environment. Since finding Arduino, the wireless aspects of embedded controller has caught my attention. That's how I found your effort.

You obviously know this subjecte. I would like to ask a few questions. (pleaes forgive my ignorance):

1) Why does a device with X at the beginning of the name dominate the Arduino-type mesh sphere?
2) Why is there not a device independent layer for mesh networking for the cheap tranceivers?
3) What will your project mean to people like me (who want to dabble) when it is done?
4) Will your project be available in some version for the Arduion IDE? (an easy to get going version)
5) What questions should I be asking that I'm missing?

Thank you for your effort.
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written by Akiba, April 03, 2010
1) Why does a device with X at the beginning of the name dominate the Arduino-type mesh sphere?
2) Why is there not a device independent layer for mesh networking for the cheap tranceivers?
3) What will your project mean to people like me (who want to dabble) when it is done?
4) Will your project be available in some version for the Arduion IDE? (an easy to get going version)
5) What questions should I be asking that I'm missing?


Hi Mike.
Here's my answers:
A1) XBee by Digi was originally made by a company called Maxstream and was one of the first companies to make 802.15.4 modules. The original XBee Arduino drivers were made by a company called Libelium who were doing open source Zigbee applications for their Squidbee. Since then, it's been quite well received by the Arduino community.

A2) Ha ha ha...hence the need for open source. Most modules are just running stock software developed by the chip manufacturer. There are almost no indie software houses making Zigbee or 802.15.4 protocol stacks, hence no device independence. The suppliers want to tie the protocol stacks into products they make. Hence XBee's stack is by Ember who doesn't allow Digi to open up the code. TI's Z-Stack is only tied to TI's radios and MCUs. Atmel's software is just ported to and licensed for Atmel products, etc...

A3) If you're interested in wireless, but just getting started, I would not recommend Zigbee. The protocol is fairly complex because of the problems of standardizing communication between embedded devices. Think what the internet would be without IP, TCP, HTTP, browsers, W3C, CSS, HTML, etc... The same is true for devices that need to be able to talk to other devices in a common language.

I would recommend checking out my Chibi stack which is in my Projects directory. It was originally designed for Tokyo Hackerspace so they could incorporate wireless into their art projects. I made it simple and small and it only supports three commands: init, send, and receive. Those are all you need for any type of communication.

A4) I'm going to start doing more stuff to bring wireless options to the Arduino. I'm particularly interested in the wearable electronics community that has formed around the Arduino. For that, I'll probably start playing around with devices like the ATMega128RFA1 which is an AVR radio in a single chip. If I can port the Arduino core libs to it and include a wireless driver, then it can make for a very compact Arduino-based wireless system for wearable electronics.

A5) I would say that you might want to specify the application you're thinking of. The crowd on this site are all involved in wireless sensors and if you specify a particular application, then someone can usually help out. You might want to post the question in the forums though since no-one really monitors comment threads. Also, I'm going to be posting my notes from teaching microcontrollers and wireless at the tokyo hackerspace soon (i've been saying that for awhile now *sigh*) so hopefully that might inspire more questions. After I can get all the busy-ness with the shop out of the way, then I also want to focus on actual applications of wireless sensor networks so I think that will be interesting also. So far, everyone is just talking about Zigbee, 802.15.4, 6LoWPAN, or the "internet of things" in abstract terms. I'd like to make all of that more concrete.
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Thank you. Another question if I may.
written by MD, April 03, 2010
Your Chibi project seems amazingly interesting.

As a civilian to your industry, it seems to me that many of the electronic engineers are "optimizing" much of the mesh features - localizing, communication speeds, etc. However, it doesn't seem to me that many of the practical needs of a mesh network require this level of engineering.

For example, suppose that the network is monitoring the moisture in the soil of a large garden. The garden sprinkler has several zones and waters each as necessary. The soil dries slowly and doesn't need a gazillion megabit optimization protocal all the time. It just needs to report the moisture a few times per day. I can see that many mesh uses would be similar.

Why not develop a simple "mesh-like" function with Chibi? It won't be a "true mesh" or get close to the technical features but it could meet the needs of the network. At a snails pace, the network could identify network nodes, wake them up, find routes, transmit data, and then put the members to sleep again.

Please forgive my ignorance on the subject, but there seems to be a need for a slower, simpler networking environment that is being overlooked.

Sincerely,

MD
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written by Akiba, April 03, 2010
Actually, if you're doing things within a localized area like your lawn, I'd recommend just doing a simple star network. Chibi or any other 802.15.4 based stack supports a star topology where you can just have all of your data transmitting to a single data sink node. You can have your firmware send the data periodically or have the sink node broadcast out a request and have each node respond. Each node is individually addressable by the address that you assign it so one node, presumably attached to the PC, could control all other nodes within listening range. To control the listening range, you can just adjust the transmit power. I've found that using 900 MHz radios with a transmit power of 10 mW (10 dBm), I'm able to cover two floors of a building and a distance of roughly 100-150m through a couple of walls. This was testing at the Tokyo Hackerspace house. This should be more than enough to cover a house and lawn. For a more distributed network or one with many nodes, than more complex topologies will be required and this is when mesh networking and other protocol features start coming in to play.

A mesh for Chibi would unfortunately complicate the Chibi software which is counter to what I'm trying to achieve. I created it to be an easy introduction to wireless sensors and communication. Once people outgrow the features of Chibi, then they should know enough about their application to compare other protocol's features to look for what they want.

I'm hoping to create some video tutorials of using other protocols such as 6LoWPAN (IPv6 over 802.15.4) and Zigbee in the future to make things easier on people trying to integrate the full strength protocols. At the moment, wireless sensor networking is still in a young phase where standards are still being hammered out (even after 7 years w/Zigbee). That's why there's a lot of posturing and hype but very few actual deployments that you hear about.
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Thanks
written by MD, April 04, 2010
You have been very generous. I will start working with Chibi.
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*(U16*) Issue
written by RNC, May 01, 2010
Some compilers will only do this as a word-aligned operation, which may break the header on some devices. It's also endian specific, so it might be safer to do something like:
*buf->dptr = hdr->src_pan_id&0xFF;
*buf->dptr = (hdr->src_pan_id>>smilies/cool.gif&0xFF;
buf->dptr = 2;

Aside from that, great work. Nice to have a reference other than IEEE's on which to verify I'm doing everything sanely.
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written by Akiba, May 01, 2010
Haven't thought about that. I'll need to test it on MSP430s and ARMs to see how it fares. A major rewrite should be coming up soon. So far, GCC seems to handle it fairly well which is the main target compiler. I have heard that there are some alignment issues on MSP430s with GCC though so I'll be watching for this.
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improving humanity
written by Dennis, May 16, 2010
I just stumbled on your site today. It's interesting, and I'm interested in a lot of things you address here.
Having just read and exchange of messages in the FreakZ area, something struck me -
You take the time to give clear, useful answers to questions you obviously took the time to read and understand. In other words, you are genuinely helpful.
However useful and impressive your efforts are in the open standards wireless field (and I don't mean to downplay them - your effort is clearly pioneering), I think you helpfulness as one human being to another is more profoundly significant.
This is how humankind improves.

I'm glad I stumbled on your site.
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written by Akiba, May 16, 2010
Thanks. Your words are probably overly kind.
Answering questions and trying to help out is par for the course in the open source world smilies/smiley.gif
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Using the stack on actual HW.
written by Richard, May 31, 2010
Hello,

Can this stack actually be used on real hardware?

From looking at the documentation it only seems to run under a simulator, yet looking at the code there seems to be a driver for the at86rf230/1.

Personally, I'm looking for wireless temperature sensors to litter around my house so I can test / monitor various changes I've made in my house regarding insulation and ventallation changes I've been making, but finding a wireless temperature sensor for less than USD$20 is near impossible (8 sensors @ $20 is easier to get past the wife than 8 sensors @ USD$160).

Thoughts / suggestions?
-Richard Maxwell
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written by Akiba, May 31, 2010
The stack will be undergoing some major changes soon, but I'll also be looking to put out some wireless temperature sensors soon using the Chibi stack. Zigbee and the other standardized protocols are looking quite big at the moment which means that the MCU required to run them will be fairly costly. Hence its going to take a large amount of volume for them to be able to push the cost under $20. I'm particularly interested in hooking up a sensor array to the Tokyo Hackerspace to monitor the temperature gradients throughout the house.
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written by Akiba, May 31, 2010
Oops...just found this. It might be what you're looking for. A $20 wireless temperature sensor:
http://www.lacrossetechnology.com/tx6/index.php
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Yup, I was wanting to do temperature gradients as well.
written by Richard, June 01, 2010
Thanks for the quick response :-)

Like most of my internet searches the $20 sensor you find is close, but no cigar (well, unless I want to hack it :-)

Basically I wanted to have around 15-20 temperature sensors around the house and log the data in 1-5 minute intervals. Wireless seemed like the best way to go, but then cost rares its ugly head :-/

Anyway, the moment someone has a working open source zigbee stack, the sooner you'll have the crazy awesome uses that people just can't predict. So, please, keep up the good work.

-Richard Maxwell
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written by Akiba, June 01, 2010
Ha ha ha...stay tuned. The wireless temp sensors will be coming rather quickly smilies/smiley.gif Only the first version will be using Chibi rather than Zigbee since its small and a good fit for a simple application like temperature monitoring.
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written by mzoltan, July 07, 2010
Hi, congratulations for Your effort.
Im searching for platform alternatives for a ZigBee enabled project (about 100nodes over 100sqm area).

Is Zstack working on the Chibi hardware?
Or the Raven hardware?
Could I have an AVR (xmega128a3) a CC2520 and a Zstack combination doing the networking of these 100 nodes?
Im not bound to use ZigBee, also considering ipv6WLAN or route under MAC as ATMEL calls it.

The only problem I have with the ATMEL CPU RF solution is its cost ~4EUR the CPU and ~2EUR the transceiver.
Im looking for something that ~3EUR CPU transceiver ....

I just stumpled on your site, not studied Your solution in detail yet.

Thanks
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written by Akiba, July 07, 2010
If you want to run a full Zigbee or 6LoWPAN stack, 3 Euros for an integrated chip is going to be difficult at the moment. The CC2530 runs around $7.50 in 100 pcs quants and thats roughly similar to the EM351 and also the ATMega128RFA1. Z-Stack can only be run on TI hardware and you only get the binary libraries so porting is not possible. Atmel's Bitcloud is similar. Your best bet is to use SICSLoWPAN which is an open source IPv6 over 802.15.4 (6LoWPAN) stack. Otherwise, I'd recommend TI's Z-Stack or Atmel's Bitcloud for a Zigbee solution. My stack needs to be updated and isn't ready for real deployment at the moment.
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ZigBee on an Android
written by Roch, October 18, 2010
Hi Akiba,

I'm starting to work on a project aiming to use ZigBee on an Android phone. I'm afraid that smart phones use a specific Wifi chip to control its antenna making impossible to implement an other protocol on it. So I'm wandering if I could use the Wifi antenna of the phone or if I had to use an external antenna.

Do you have an opinion on my problem?

Roch
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written by Akiba, October 19, 2010
I'd recommend making a WiFi to 802.15.4 gateway device. You can get the Microchip 802.11 modules pretty cheap and they come with a TCP IP stack. You should be able to send data to it via the Android phone. From there, then just pull the data out of the module and send it out the 802.15.4 chip.
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zigbee stack for linux/openwrt?
written by Antoin O Lachtnain, November 10, 2010
Hi Akiba,

I'm trying to build something with zigbee on OpenWRT at the moment. Ideally, it would be open-source, but the project is the sort where I could get money for a stack if it was needed. Do you know who has a commercial stack that would work on an OpenWRT box, or similar?
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Ember EM250
written by Rohit Taneja, February 13, 2011
Hey Akiba, I wish to know if i can use this Zstack for EM250 (by Ember) application development? I mean would it be compatible, how do i check it?
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written by Akiba, February 13, 2011
I haven't worked on FreakZ for a while now so I probably wouldn't recommend using it. Its probably best to use an off-the-shelf stack like TI's Z-Stack or Ember's Zigbee stack. I'm not sure if I'll be continuing on this project in the future. I'm mostly focusing on 6LoWPAN at the moment.
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Use of freakZ stack
written by VaeNKiel, April 06, 2011
Hi Akiba, i have a question about use of freakZ stack. FreakZ stack support mesh networks? Analyzing the source code I had seen a file named "nwk_rte_mesh.c" and i think it's the support for this kind of networks.
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help
written by macduan, December 07, 2011
Hello Akiba,
Thanks for your amazing job. I have a problem with test_sim. In ../test_sim, I type ./sim to start the simulator then enter add 1, at this time the xwin printing the same line looply. I don't why and how to
solve it.
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written by Akiba, December 07, 2011
The sim program is expecting two folders to be in the directory. The names are "fifo" and "log". Can you make sure those exist? The problem was that the simulator was just supposed to be a one-off throwaway tool but it turns out that people actually find it useful. I'm not sure if I'll continue supporting FreakZ though because of the big Zigbee fiasco. I'm still considering.
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Big ZigBee fiasco?
written by Jan, January 24, 2012
Akiba,
What is the reason behind saying "the big ZigBee fiasco"?
Doesn't ZigBee move in a sound direction?

I'm running a company who develops controls for buildings. After starting working with ZigBee we found that trying to be so very Plug&Play;comes at a very high cost. The price of interoperability is low performance on a systems level, low time determinism, high latency.
This is kind of ok if you use wireless to extend, or add functionality to, an existing system. But if you base a complete electrical system on a wireless network, or a combination of wireless and wired, you can not live with this.
In larger installations you need high data throughput, time synchronism, a few milliseconds latency, efficient fall-back mechanisms, a de centralized fail-safe behaviour, good co-existence across a facility and ...
So - does ZigBee really solve the correct problem? It wants to be the solution for everything, but in doing so, it may fail to be really usefull for anything.
Whats your view?
/Jan
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porting freakz to cc2530
written by Adamfoward, April 14, 2012
Akiba,
Sorry to disturb you!I am doing some research in IEEE802.15.4 mac,so i want to porting your freakZ to cc2530,is it possible or meaningful for doing this??And how should i go about it before porting??would you give me some advice?
thanks,
Adam.
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written by Akiba, April 14, 2012
If Zigbee is not needed, you should consider using Contiki instead. I believe there is a port for that chip. If Zigbee is needed, you should use the TI Zigbee stack which should support their own chips.
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porting freakz to cc2530
written by Adamfoward, April 17, 2012
Thanks,Akiba.you are right,there is a port for cc2430 and cc2530 both and we need ZigBee.But you know,the TI's zstack is not open,so we can't change the mac or nwk based on our needs,your freakz is excellent,thus I decide to port your freakz to cc2530,so how can I port your freakz to cc2530 after porting contiki to cc2530?It sounds a little boring but i am a newer in porting and in desperate need of help. smilies/cheesy.gif
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Go Akiba!
written by ian-dp, June 08, 2012
Make the hell out of that stack bro! smilies/smiley.gif
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written by Akiba, June 08, 2012
Hey Ian.
Actually, I stopped dev on the Zigbee stack. I'm not convinced its worth it, especially after all the pain I went through with the Zigbee Alliance. I'll be playing around more with 6LoWPAN and Bluetooth Low Energy. That should be interesting.
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Engineer
written by Nasri, August 02, 2012
Hi Akiba,
it's a really good work what you've done, so thanks a lot for it !!
in fact, i wanted to have your point of view concerning which stack is relatively easy to deploy and use on the new ADI platform "ADUCRF101" based on an ARM cortex-M3. i tried with Z-Stack and it seems that porting it isn't a one man project so i'm searching for other solution which might be more flexible, even thought, it rest only 4 weeks to have a simple demo version of a WSN with my HW !
Thx in advance for your help. smilies/smiley.gif
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written by Asim, September 18, 2012
Hi There,

Does FreakZ support SE profile 1.0, or parts of it? or does it supply an API layer to then implement the SE Profile 1.0 yourself?

Asim.
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written by Akiba, September 19, 2012
Sorry. FreakZ does not support SE v1.0. You'd need to implement that device profile.
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FreakZ on MC1322x
written by Asim, September 27, 2012
Hi Guys,

Has anyone ported FreakZ on the ARM7 based MC1322x freescale zigbee chip? It would be great to get some pointers on what path to follow to port it to MC1322x or any other zigbee chip.

regards
Asim
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Zigbee Alliance and Open Source
written by Asim, September 27, 2012
Hi Akiba,

You mentioned that the Zigbee alliance gave you pain and you have decided to not work on this stack. what sort of pain did they give you? Is it because you have an open source stack and they dont want to give you a certification? Could you please shine some light on this?

Regards
Asim.
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written by Akiba, September 30, 2012
FreakZ hasn't been ported to the MC1322x chip. The development was stopped a few years back so I don't think its in use at the moment.

Regarding your question about the problems, it was mainly that there was an intellectual property issue regarding the use of the Zigbee specification. If you used the spec, looked at it, etc, then you were not able to release anything Zigbee related unless you were part of the Zigbee Alliance. I had asked for them to remove this condition since it's not conducive to open source, ie: the stack is free but you'd need to be a member of Zigbee to use it. That was shot down so I quit the alliance and halted development on the stack.
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Open-source WSN library
written by msr, October 25, 2012
What about developing a 802.15.4 based open stack with mesh capability? I really hate the Zigbee Alliance policy and I don't like the fact that the standard is limited to 250kpbs (low rate).
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unable to build freakZ_v075: Need inputs
written by Ganapathy Viswanath, February 13, 2013
Hi Akiba,

1)Running make in test_sim directory
2)Getting message undefined reference to pthread_cancel, pthread_create in main

I am unable to build in Ubuntu12.04
Thanks
Viswa
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written by Akiba, February 13, 2013
The FreakZ stack and sim haven't been updated since 2008. I had a falling out with the Zigbee Alliance way back when and decided to stop development on it. The simulator hasn't been updated and I wouldn't use it.
Sorry about that.
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Need PHY and MAC of IEEE802.15.4
written by Ganapathy Viswanath, February 13, 2013
Thank you Akiba.

I am looking for a standalone working IEEE802.15.4 PHY and MAC. If possible higher layers as well. How I can I use FreakZ for the same?

I could abstract out the PHY as much as possible (as an event which generates interrupts at random intervals).

I am trying to build a system to study co-existence with WLAN.

Thanks,
Viswa
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Compatability
written by Kush Parikh, November 20, 2013
Thanks Akiba,

I really want to try this stack out. Is this stack compatible with TI's CC2530? And if it is, can I use Keil to compile it and download it onto the chip?

I'm using the SmartRF05EB and SmartRF05BB for a small demo and was using a trial license of IAR Embedded Workbench with the ZStack stack from TI. Since my trial has just expired and ZStack is only compatible with IAR, I am looking for another stack out there that might help me continue my project.

Thanks,

Kush
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written by Akiba, November 20, 2013
I'm not developing FreakZ anymore. You'd have to port it to Keil if you wanted to use that compiler. Most of my development was based on using GCC.
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