Home arrow Blog
Blog
Wrecking Crew Orchestra - Cosmic Beat Behind the Scenes | Print |
Written by Akiba   
Monday, 09 December 2013

Last week, Wrecking Crew Orchestra wrapped up their Cosmic Beat show which I helped out with. There were six performances in total, three in Osaka and three in Tokyo and it was a blast working on it with them. They recently published the opening set from the show which featured Wrecking Crew Orchestra, EL Squad. This was the group that made a big splash with "Tron Dance" in 2012.  

The Cosmic Beat show used quite a bit of modern stage technology including projection mapping and laser graphics. For projection mapping, they were using two 20,000 lumen projectors for the set projection and worked with a VFX company on the graphics for the mapping. We also worked with Shinichi Suzuki, aka "Laser Master", from Akari Center in Tokyo who did the laser work and normally does large concert venues. He's a topnotch laser guy and I learned a lot from him about how to operate lasers and laser scanners.

Read more...
 
Introducing the Freakduino 900 MHz Long Range Wireless Board v2.1a | Print |
Written by Akiba   
Wednesday, 25 September 2013

I'm proud to introduce the latest addition to the Freakduino family. This is the Freakduino 900 MHz Long Range wireless board. On the outside, it looks fairly similar to the other Freakduino boards, but under the hood, it's tuned to communicate over long distances. This board uses the same radio as the standard Freakduino 900 MHz board but adds a TI CC1190 RF front end. This boosts the transmit power from 10 mW (+10 dBm) to 500 mW (+27 dBm). There's also a low noise amplifier on the receiver which gives the received signal an +11 dB boost (>10X). Altogether, this chip adds +38 dB to the link budget which is massive gain in the wireless world.

I originally designed this circuit a few years back when I was looking for something to do long distance wireless sensor links, on the order of kilometers or tens of kilometers. 2.4 GHz gets a bit hard to drive that far since higher frequencies have more attenuation in free space as well as a difficult time going through objects. Lower frequencies have much less attenuation and are able to travel through obstacles more easily so they're ideal for situations where range is valued over speed. In sensor networks, data rate usually has a low priority compared to battery life and communications range.

Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 1 - 6 of 6653